Monday, Apr 16th, 2012 ↓
positive-press-daily:

Toronto becomes first city to mandate green roofs

Toronto is the first city in North America with a bylaw that requires roofs to be green. And we’re not talking about paint. A green roof, also known as a living roof, uses various hardy plants to create a barrier between the sun’s rays and the tiles or shingles of the roof. The plants love the sun, and the building (and its inhabitants) enjoy more comfortable indoor temperatures as a result.
Toronto’s new legislation will require all residential, commercial and institutional buildings over 2,000 square meters to have between 20 and 60 percent living roofs. Although it’s been in place since early 2010, the bylaw will apply to new industrial development as of April 30, 2012. While this is the first city-wide mandate involving green roofs, Toronto’s decision follow’s in the footsteps of other cities, like Chicago and New York.
Under the direction of Mayor Richard Daley the city of Chicago put a 38,800 square foot green roof on a 12 story skyscraper in 2000. Twelve years later, that building now saves $5000 annually on utility bills, and Chicago boasts 7 million square feet of green roof space. New York has followed suit, and since planting a green roof on the Con Edison Learning Centre in Queens, the buildings managers have seen a 34 percent reduction of heat loss in winter, and reduced summer heat gain by 84 percent.
But lower utility bills aren’t the only benefit of planting a living roof. In addition to cooling down the city, green roofs create cleaner air, cleaner water, and provide a peaceful oasis for people, birds and insects in an otherwise polluted, concrete and asphalt-covered environment.

positive-press-daily:

Toronto becomes first city to mandate green roofs

Toronto is the first city in North America with a bylaw that requires roofs to be green. And we’re not talking about paint. A green roof, also known as a living roof, uses various hardy plants to create a barrier between the sun’s rays and the tiles or shingles of the roof. The plants love the sun, and the building (and its inhabitants) enjoy more comfortable indoor temperatures as a result.

Toronto’s new legislation will require all residential, commercial and institutional buildings over 2,000 square meters to have between 20 and 60 percent living roofs. Although it’s been in place since early 2010, the bylaw will apply to new industrial development as of April 30, 2012. While this is the first city-wide mandate involving green roofs, Toronto’s decision follow’s in the footsteps of other cities, like Chicago and New York.

Under the direction of Mayor Richard Daley the city of Chicago put a 38,800 square foot green roof on a 12 story skyscraper in 2000. Twelve years later, that building now saves $5000 annually on utility bills, and Chicago boasts 7 million square feet of green roof space. New York has followed suit, and since planting a green roof on the Con Edison Learning Centre in Queens, the buildings managers have seen a 34 percent reduction of heat loss in winter, and reduced summer heat gain by 84 percent.

But lower utility bills aren’t the only benefit of planting a living roof. In addition to cooling down the city, green roofs create cleaner air, cleaner water, and provide a peaceful oasis for people, birds and insects in an otherwise polluted, concrete and asphalt-covered environment.

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Monday, Mar 26th, 2012 ↓
9gag:

Mario Toilet

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(Source: toptumbles)

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“In the age of information, ignorance is a choice”

—Donny Miller (via elige)

(Source: thescienceofreality)

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Tuesday, Mar 20th, 2012 ↓
speaksoftlyandcarrybigstick:

PURL to Host Phoenix Urban Design Week in April

This April, ASU’s Phoenix Urban Research Laboratory is bringing together creatives, academics and urban planners for a week of discussions on Phoenix’s problems and potential.
The first-ever Phoenix Urban Design Week begins Monday, April 9, with two lectures — one centered on Images of America: Downtown Phoenix, a book of historical photos and stories by Jim McPherson, J. Seth Anderson and Suad Mahmuljin, and the other highlighting an art installation from Sloan McFarland, principal of midtown’s Martha + Mary. 
Tuesday offers a screening of the documentary Making Sense of Place — Phoenix: The Urban Desert, and Wednesday brings a much-hyped debate between Andrew Ross, author of Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City, and Grady Gammage Jr., senior research fellow at ASU’s Morrison Institute for Public Policy and a vocal critic of the book.
But the capstone of Urban Design Week is PURL’s annual symposium, a two-day event that brings in national and local speakers to discuss and showcase their research on “retrofitting the suburbs,” says PURL assistant director Aaron Kimberlin.
“It’s about activating space,” he says. “In Phoenix, we have a lot of vacant land that needs to be utilized, and we have a lot of post-World War II homes that can be reinvented.”
Friday’s symposium includes an analysis of RetroPHX, a contest designed to gather ideas about how to improve Phoenix’s urban sprawl, while Thursday night ushers in the return of PURL Jam, a rapid-fire presentation of ideas from top urban thinkers that was part of last year’s Phoenix Design Week.
Kimberlin says Phoenix Urban Design Week was inspired by the success of Phoenix Design Week, whose creator, Mark Dudlik, even offered his non-profit Lost Creature as a supporting organization of Urban Design Week.
“The more the merrier,” Dudlik said in an email. “It is a type of design we don’t have a lot of time to focus on during Phoenix Design Week, so its nice to have a week devoted to it.”
For the complete schedule, visit phxudw.com. For tickets to individual events, register online. All events will be at PURL, on the eighth floor of 234 N. Central Ave. in downtown Phoenix.

Very tempted but then again I have three 10+ page papers to work on with less than four weeks remaining in the semester.

speaksoftlyandcarrybigstick:

PURL to Host Phoenix Urban Design Week in April

This April, ASU’s Phoenix Urban Research Laboratory is bringing together creatives, academics and urban planners for a week of discussions on Phoenix’s problems and potential.

The first-ever Phoenix Urban Design Week begins Monday, April 9, with two lectures — one centered on Images of America: Downtown Phoenix, a book of historical photos and stories by Jim McPherson, J. Seth Anderson and Suad Mahmuljin, and the other highlighting an art installation from Sloan McFarland, principal of midtown’s Martha + Mary

Tuesday offers a screening of the documentary Making Sense of Place — Phoenix: The Urban Desert, and Wednesday brings a much-hyped debate between Andrew Ross, author of Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City, and Grady Gammage Jr., senior research fellow at ASU’s Morrison Institute for Public Policy and a vocal critic of the book.

But the capstone of Urban Design Week is PURL’s annual symposium, a two-day event that brings in national and local speakers to discuss and showcase their research on “retrofitting the suburbs,” says PURL assistant director Aaron Kimberlin.

“It’s about activating space,” he says. “In Phoenix, we have a lot of vacant land that needs to be utilized, and we have a lot of post-World War II homes that can be reinvented.”

Friday’s symposium includes an analysis of RetroPHX, a contest designed to gather ideas about how to improve Phoenix’s urban sprawl, while Thursday night ushers in the return of PURL Jam, a rapid-fire presentation of ideas from top urban thinkers that was part of last year’s Phoenix Design Week.

Kimberlin says Phoenix Urban Design Week was inspired by the success of Phoenix Design Week, whose creator, Mark Dudlik, even offered his non-profit Lost Creature as a supporting organization of Urban Design Week.

“The more the merrier,” Dudlik said in an email. “It is a type of design we don’t have a lot of time to focus on during Phoenix Design Week, so its nice to have a week devoted to it.”

For the complete schedule, visit phxudw.com. For tickets to individual events, register online. All events will be at PURL, on the eighth floor of 234 N. Central Ave. in downtown Phoenix.

Very tempted but then again I have three 10+ page papers to work on with less than four weeks remaining in the semester.

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mothernaturenetwork:

An energy-saving socket concept that’s not for the easily startledThe PumPing Tap is a spring-loaded electrical socket that physically ejects plugs belonging to appliances and electronics that are not being used but still drawing small amounts of energy in standby mode.

mothernaturenetwork:

An energy-saving socket concept that’s not for the easily startled
The PumPing Tap is a spring-loaded electrical socket that physically ejects plugs belonging to appliances and electronics that are not being used but still drawing small amounts of energy in standby mode.

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Monday, Mar 12th, 2012 ↓

speaksoftlyandcarrybigstick:

Ralph McQuarrie, the artist who developed the look of the first Star Wars trilogy’s signature characters, sets and spaceships, has died. He was 82.

McQuarrie’s death last Saturday at his Berkeley home was announced on his official website and Facebook page. John Scoleri, co-author of a book on McQuarrie’s art, told the Los Angeles Times that McQuarrie had suffered from Parkinson’s disease.

In a statement on the official Star Wars website, George Lucas said McQuarrie was the first person he hired to help him envision what would become some of the top-grossing movies of all time.

“His genial contribution, in the form of unequaled production paintings, propelled and inspired all of the cast and crew of the original Star Wars trilogy,” Lucas said. “When words could not convey my ideas, I could always point to one of Ralph’s fabulous illustrations.”

McQuarrie’s original concepts included the look of some of pop culture’s most recognizable characters, including Darth Vader, C-3P0 and R2-D2. He also created the look of the Stormtroopers and the lightsaber.

Other movies to which McQuarrie contributed concept illustrations included Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. He won an Academy Award for Visual Effects for his work on the 1985 film Cocoon.

McQuarrie worked as a technical illustrator at Boeing before his career in the film industry took off, the Times said. He saw combat in the Korean War and survived a bullet that pierced his helmet.

He is survived by his wife, sister and two stepsons, the Times said.

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Monday, Mar 5th, 2012 ↓
lunchsackpoetry:

love is a messy spill / by Kermit Mulkins
(via Poems for Maria’s Lunch Sacks)

lunchsackpoetry:

love is a messy spill / by Kermit Mulkins

(via Poems for Maria’s Lunch Sacks)

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vel-cro:

Mike get me this

vel-cro:

Mike get me this

(Source: cutest-cats)

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